Truth And Love (That’s what I have to get into)

Weather it is inner conflict or world conflict,

The cliche is that the truth will set you free,

Love is about being honest with each other and finding the truth,

Love is telling the truth when it would be way easier to tell a lie,

How can a ‘Facebook’ tell the truth or love for that matter?

Who is telling the truth?

Are our politics making us better at love and truth?

The platforms on the internet are challenging to news, the truth and love in our ability to learn and maintain the truth at large.

The politics and hate spin is making it difficult to follow up on the truth.

There is a lot of misdirection, confusion, and deceit.

In this sense, we are becoming global citizen’s.

We need to watch our learning to obtain the truth on issues we use to have handed to us,

Are you sure about what the science is on some issues? Global warming?, GMO’s?

What is ‘fake news’?

Take some responsibility and demand the best from the brand names of news agencies or people you can trust.

[Plato,Philosopher], The Proper Use Of Impressions 

In this dialogue, Plato speaks to a fellow philosopher about the tool of reason and the stain of oratory, opinion and illusion on the practice of virtue.

Plato:  Oratory has the same relation to justice as a Supreme Court judge played by a actor: a mischievous, base interpretation which creates a false impression.  This illusion is fostered by props like costumes and makeup, a beauty without soul, the result of training and discipline.

Philosopher:   This is not reason but emotion.

P:  Yes, an exploitation, politics and makeup appeal to the emotions.

Pr:  We don’t need another Hitler or Mussolini.

P:  We need to practice virtue which is the proper use of impression.  A long view of philosophy, as a guide, along with reason to lead us away from the passion of warring and creating injustice and harm in the world.

Pr:  We need the Philosopher King

P:  Or we need to be more like the philosopher king.

[Voltaire and Socrates], The Grand Design

In this dialogue, two great philosophers discuss the meaning of life.

Voltaire: Why did they kill you?

Socrates: Because I believe in the world like you might believe in the cosmos.

V: What does that mean?

S: I think we need to believe in more than saying something. We need to do it.

V: How so?

S: Simple, in your day to day interactions with people, tolerate their and your own differences. Don’t scrap over them. Be good. Do no harm.

V: I like your message. I wrote a book about it called Treatise on Toleration.

S: Sounds good, but I believe I need to put my words into action whenever possible.

V: How so?

S: I question myself and others to think about the truth of the matter and to put myself into action while presenting myself to others. People are highly intelligent and think as well or better than me. I like to use my method to produce as much thought and action from others to improve the world. This I believe is the grand design: universal law.

[Socrates and Rich man], On Being A ‘Gadfly’

In this dialogue, the Socratic method is about holding people accountable for their beliefs by questioning them as a guide, who is really wishing them ‘good thoughts’. Socrates compared himself to being a midwife in the sense he tries to guide others to having better thought like having a baby. In fact, he also is said to have called himself a Gadfly of Athens.

Socrates: How important is it to you?

Rich man: Money is a road to power, which I enjoy. It is a form of currency. It circulates like an electric current. And it has power like an electric current. But now, we must state the truth. It is an agreed upon system of coins and bills that a group uses to buy goods. This group is usually a recognized country like the USA that has dollars and coins.

S: Why do you want power?

Rm: Who doesn’t? I crave it. To me, there is never enough money or power. I think I crave the latter more.

S: What do you gain?

Rm: More power. I am in lust with it. I will never have enough. It is intoxicatingly everything.

S: Would you help people with your wealth and power? Maybe, by showing them how to built a well to hold water when they have no water?

Rm: I would need some help.

S: I have a friend who would show you, but you would have to pay a small price for it.

Rm: Would poor people pay me back?

S: I am sure they would when they are able. Do you want to think of other ways to help people?

Rm: Not particularly, but perhaps I could be persuaded for a small price.

S: What did you have in mind?

Rm: A small profit.

S: For you?

Rm: Maybe, and for them too.

S: What would you say to doing it for free?

Rm: I suppose I could afford it.

S: I imagine I could do better by talking to many rich people about it.

[Alexander and Diogenes], The Greater Freedom

In this dialogue, Alexander the Great, apologizes to the great Cynic Diogenes when each fiery remark enables numerous replies.

Alexander:  If I could be you, I would give up me.  But I am trying to civilize the barbarian hoard into the Grecian way.

Diogenes:  Being free of my ego is better than money, fame or power.  And you will never experience it.

A:  I am sorry you feel this way.  You teach me to be better with less in many ways.  You accomplish more with less by using your mind in difficult good ways.

D:  Exercise the habits of freedom and you will be at peace.

[Homer, Ulysses], Ithaca

In this dialogue, the author of the Odyssey has an imaginary talk with the story's main character Ulysses (the Latin name for Odysseus). He is also the author, ascribed by their Ancient Greeks, of the other epic poem called the Iliad. Ithaca is the real place the author ascribes the home or kingdom of the imaginary character Ulysses. Here in the west we still need ways to guide us through our own journey and many people find substance in these two epic poems.

Homer: Well, Odysseus, you are finally coming home from the Trojan War. What shall you do?

Ulysses: I wish you would use my Latin name. And not dwell on the past.

H: I am a poet. My job is to unify humanity.

U: Sure, anything you say, so now I have to go on an epic adventure!

H: Yes, rather than dwelling on the war and anger, I want you to bring us together by illustrating that life is a journey and that god intervenes along the way.

U: Yes, yes, but why does it have to be so long, can't you just let me go home and be done with it. For God's sake, it takes a good twenty years. And what's up with all the gods?

H: Odysseus, 20 years to represent the gods and a person's life is nothing. Humanity must understand that life is full of 'ups and downs' and that the gods or 'what we believe' is important in learning along the way.

U: Well, I'm okay about your message, but I prefer to be called Ulysses.

H: Very well, I wouldn't want to make you angry, again.

[Teacher and Student], Build Your Brain

In this dialogue, neuroplasticity and behavior is discussed with those learning to live and love.  They explore the responsibility we have to receive fruitful outcomes or growing problems.

Teacher:  There is no good behavior there is only behavior. 

Student:  What does that mean.

T:  Everything you learn, good or bad will change your brain.  The best habits for you may not work on your friend.  The best habits for you today, may not work for you tomorrow.

S:  Does that mean that I may be a good learner today and a bad one tomorrow?

T:  Essentially, yes.  If you do harm, like consume drugs every day.  You may create a bad habit.  If you do good, like learn your work.  You may create a good habit.

S:  Will meditation and exercise and healthy eating and good routine help my overall ability to have better results.

T:  Yes.  And so will a supportive community and connections with people in your life.

S:  Is not this a recipe for Success and failure?

T:  In a way,  we still need to study and learn what is best for ourselves on the day to day basis.  There is no magic about it.  You still need to do the work.